Turkish Ejders in Hungary

Turkish Ejders in Hungary
Turkish Ejders in Hungary

The Hungarian Defence Ministry took over the first ten Gidrán-type, supportive armoured vehicles from Nurol Makina on Thursday. The vehicles are deployed at the barracks of the 25th György Klapka Brigade of the Hungarian Armed Forces.


Hungarian Defence Minister Tibor Benkő said that forty more vehicles would arrive in Tata soon.

The Minister emphasized that several units of the army will be equipped with vehicles that are already being built in Hungary, together with the Turkish manufacturer.

Tibor Benkő added that the given Gidrán vehicles handed over - similarly to the other recently acquired technical equipment - were made taking into account the combat experience and supplementing the Hungarian needs.



Engin Aykol, CEO of Nurol Makina, said these vehicles were built from the Ejder Yalcin platform. Thousands of variants of the type have been made, they are in service in many parts of the world.

The CEO underlined that Hungary is the first EU state to have this vehicle in inventory and Nurol Makina is ready to invest in Hungary and create a local company.

The vehicles will be manufactured in Hungary, in Kaposvár, on the model of the Turkish NUROL MAKINA Ejder Yalcin and NMS 4x4 military vehicles.

In the production of four-wheel-drive vehicles in Hungary, they are gradually switching to the incorporation of European weapon systems. The production and research and development related to the program will be carried out in German-Hungarian cooperation.

The Ejder Yalcin combat vehicle was introduced in 2014 in Turkey, Department of Special Operations.

The 16-tonne device is powered by a 375-horsepower diesel engine, with a top speed of 120 kilometres per hour and a range of up to 700 kilometres. Its wheels are bulletproof, its lower armour is shaft-resistant, and a stabilized 12.7-millimeter machine gun has been mounted in its turret.

The Gidrán is a horse breed developed in Hungary from bloodstock that included the Arabian horse