Marines’ Unmanned Truck Fire Anti-Ship Missile to Hit Target at Sea

Marines’ Unmanned Truck Fire Anti-Ship Missile to Hit Target at Sea
Marines’ Unmanned Truck Fire Anti-Ship Missile to Hit Target at Sea

The Marine Corps deployed an unmanned truck to the seashore to strike a surface target at sea. Marines launched a Navy missile from the back of an unmanned tactical vehicle in a first-ever live-fire test.


The U.S. Marine Corps wants to be able to sink ships, and it wants that ability fast. The service is looking to field its own anti-ship missiles to defend Marines on shore from nearby enemy warships.

As a result, the Marine Corps has combined two existing technologies. As a result, the Navy-Marine Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System (NMESIS) can launch naval strike missiles from the back of a modified Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, or JLTV, to destroy targets on land or at sea.

Marines’ Unmanned Truck Fire Anti-Ship Missile to Hit Target at Sea

The JLTV used in the test at Point Mugu is an unmanned version known as a ROGUE -- or remotely operated ground unit for expeditionary -- fires vehicle. The naval strike missile fired from the back carries a 500-pound class warhead, according to Raytheon. The Navy uses the missile on littoral combat ships.

Marines’ Unmanned Truck Fire Anti-Ship Missile to Hit Target at Sea

Raytheon Missiles and Defence, which makes the naval strike missile, announced Wednesday that the Marine Corps used NMESIS to hit a target in the water from Point Mugu Sea Range in California. The missile can take out targets from more than 100 nautical miles away.

In 2021, the Marine Corps requested $125 million to buy nearly 50 Tomahawk missiles it could launch from land.